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Video visual scene displays (Babb et al., 2021)

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journal contribution
posted on 08.10.2021, 18:05 by Salena Babb, David McNaughton, Janice Light, Jessica Caron
Purpose: Social interaction poses many challenges for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and complex communication needs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of video visual scene displays (video VSDs) on communication during interactions between adolescents with ASD and peer partners.
Method: This study used an across-participant multiple-baseline single-case experimental design. Four adolescents with ASD and complex communication needs were taught to use video VSDs, presented on a tablet-based app, during social interactions with peer partners in a high school setting. The video VSDs used during the interactions were selected (and programmed with vocabulary) based on the interests of the adolescent with ASD and their peer partner.
Results: Following the introduction of the video VSD intervention, all four adolescents with ASD demonstrated an increase in communicative turns compared to baseline (Tau-U = 1.0, 95% CI [0.56, 1]), and all four increased in modes of communication used. Increased use of speech also was observed for the three participants who made use of speech prior to the intervention. All participants with ASD (and their peer partners) expressed an interest in continued use of the video VSD app to support social interaction.
Conclusion: The use of video VSDs may be a viable option to increase the participation and communication of adolescents with ASD during social interactions with peer partners.

Supplemental Material S1. Participant communication.
Table S1. Participant social validity.
Table S2. Peer Social Validity Questionnaire and Responses: Five-item questionnaire during baseline.
Table S3. Peer Social Validity Questionnaire and Responses: Five-item questionnaire during intervention.
Table S4. Peer Social Validity Questionnaire and Responses.
Table S5. Peer Social Validity Responses (open response items).
Table S6. Staff Social Validity Questionnaire and Responses.
Table S7. Staff Social Validity Responses (open response items).

Babb, S., McNaughton, D., Light, D., & Caron, J. (2021). “Two friends spending time together”: The impact of video visual scene displays on peer social interaction for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1044/2021_LSHSS-21-00016

Funding

The contents of this article were developed under grants from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR, Grant 90RE5017 and Grant 90REGE0014). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this article/poster do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. Salena Babb was supported by the Penn State AAC Doctoral Leadership Project, a doctoral training grant funded by U.S. Department of Education Grant H325D170024. This article is based on the dissertation completed by Babb (2020).

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