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Children With Cochlear Implants and With Typical Hearing (Iglehart, 2016)

dataset
posted on 01.06.2016, 00:00 by Frank Iglehart
Purpose This study measured speech perception ability in children with cochlear implants and children with typical hearing when listening across ranges of reverberation times (RTs) and speech-to-noise ratios.
Method Participants listened in classroom RTs of 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 s combined with a 21-dB range of speech-to-noise ratios. Subsets also listened in a low-reverberant audiological sound booth. Performance measures using the Bamford-Kowal-Bench Speech-in-Noise Test (Etymotic Research, Inc., 2005) were 50% correct word recognition across these acoustic conditions, with supplementary analyses of percent correct.
Results Reduction in RT from 0.9 to 0.6 s benefited both groups of children. A further reduction in RT to 0.3 s provided additional benefit to the children with cochlear implants, with no further benefit or harm to those with typical hearing. Scores in the sound booth were significantly higher for the participants with implants than in the classroom. Conclusions These results support the acoustic standards of 0.6 s RT for children with typical hearing and 0.3 s RT for children with auditory issues in learning spaces (?283 m3) as specified in standards S12.60-2010/Part 1 of the American National Standards Institute /Acoustical Society of America (2010) . In addition, speech perception testing in a low-reverberant booth overestimated classroom listening ability in children with cochlear implants.

Funding

This research was supported by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Grant H133G060116 and grants from the Gustuvus and Louise Pfeiffer Research Foundation, awarded to Frank Iglehart. The author thanks Arthur Boothroyd, John Bradley, Richard Freyman, and Margaret Skinner for comments and suggestions throughout this project, and the participants and their families for their time and cooperation. Preliminary reports on segments of this study were presented at the 19th International Congress on Acoustics, Madrid, Spain; Acoustics '08 - Joint Conference of the Acoustical Society of America and the European Acoustics Association, Paris, France; Inter-Noise 2009 - The 38th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, Ottawa, Canada; and EURONOISE 2009 - Action on Noise in Europe, Edinburgh, Scotland.

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